September 2019

Hyundai Palisade Proves to be a Fab Family Car My name is Rachel Naud and I’m a Toyota girl. I have owned and driven Toyota cars for the past 16 years and thought no other manufacturer could ever break the bond I have with my beloved brand of choice. Then I had the opportunity to drive a 2020 Hyundai Palisade for a week, and it got me in my feels. Firstly, the vehicle is b-e-a-u-t-i-f-u-l. I’m talking strangers-coming-up-to-you-to-ask-what-kind-of-car-it-is hot. And, guess what: Even though it offers up some serious eye candy, it’s a total mom-mobile, which just goes to show you CAN have it all, ladies! The Palisade has good looks, great function and —the best part — you won’t need to work into your golden years to pay it off. Luxury ride The Palisade is Hyundai’s largest SUV. With its third row of seating, eight people can easily and comfortably fit in the car. While the third row in many vehicles is often where the kids who draw the shortest straws have to sit, this isn’t the case with the Palisade. There is actual leg room back there, so your very-backseat passengers don’t have to ride with their knees touching their chins. It’s also super easy to fold those seats up and down when needed as it’s as simple as pressing a button. Same with lifting the trunk of the car, which was super helpful when walking to the car with handfuls of groceries or sports equipment. The interior is luxurious throughout with its quilted Napa leather seats, 10-inch touchscreen navigation and more outlets than I have ever seen on four wheels. There’s no chance of anybody’s smartphone or tablet dying on a road trip, which is music to any parent’s ears. While, we’re now going into the cooler, fall months, when I drove the Palisade, it was during the peak summer temps of August. Why am I telling you this? Because the Palisade has COOLING. SEATS. It’s a feature I never knew I needed in my life. As the hot sun was beating down on the car and through the windows, my backside enjoyed an easy, breezy cooling sensation that kept me comfy, even in the longest traffic jam. For those colder fall and winter days, there is also the option to warm the seats and the steering wheel for toasty travels. Fun features There’s a lot to love about this car, but one of the features I

10 Teen Slang Words You Should Know Every generation has their own, unique way of influencing language, like creating slang that only their peers will understand. Today, as Gen Zers enter teenhood, many Xennials and Millennials will be hard-pressed to understand exactly what on earth they’re saying. With new cultural reference points and trending speaking styles coming from celebrities, shows and memes – basically, the Internet – now may be the time to follow in Oprah and Gayle’s footsteps and freshen up on your teen slang. “Slang is, by definition, just informal language. In that sense, slang shouldn’t be considered “degraded language” but, rather, a variant of the predominant variety used by a community of speakers. From a sociolinguistic perspective, adolescents are generally the primary drivers of language change. They are more daring and creative with regard to language and they innovate much more than do speakers in other age brackets. This tendency to innovate language is part in parcel of the cognitive development that teenagers experience during adolescence, which sees them asserting their independence from their family unit and forging strong social connections with peers. Peppering their everyday speak with slang terms known primarily or exclusively within the peer group helps to solidify the new social bonds”, says Jennifer Dorman, Instructional Designer in Didactics at leading language app Babbel. So you can get down with the kids – linguistically, at any rate –Dorman shares some of the most popular teen slang today, along with definitions: Skrrt: Rapidly leaving / expression of excitement The easiest way to wrap your mind around this term is to think of the sound a car makes as it’s driving away at high speed, with its wheels screeching. It’s pronounced similarly to ‘skirt’, but usually in a high-pitched tone, and was first popularized in rap songs to convey the rapper trying to get away from something, or someone. Waste man: Worthless person A waste man is a negative term to refer to someone who makes poor decisions, acts poorly or is not doing much with their lives. Finsta: Fake / Fun Instagram This term is another attempt by teens to deceive their parents and was originally used to refer to a ‘fake Instagram’ account, which would be used for posts you don’t want your parents, or wider family, to see. The meaning has since grown to include any secondary or fake item, like a second Twitter account, or a secret phone. Cancelled: No longer relevant Frequently used when speaking about celebrities who are considered no longer relevant, or have said or done

Outnumbered Overtime Anchor, Harris Faulkner on Raising Confident Young Women   Harris Faulkner may be Outnumbered but she’s succeeding. The first black woman at Fox to host her own weekday daytime show, the journalist and mom has some strong words about being confident, being heard in the world and what she tells her daughters when it comes to both.   You are the first black woman at Fox anchoring her own daytime news program. What does that mean to you and to others who want to be you? I am in fact, the first at Fox black woman with her own weekday daytime show and I was the first woman in prime time for our network, too. Just in terms of Fox’s progress in the area of diversity but also a mom and wife, it is gratifying to see a lot of hard work and barrier busting come true. My rise is more though than just a statistic and it's not just about me and my own ambitions. Having a black woman sit alone on a set designed for her show is necessary, powerful and emblematic of real change.  And I would not be in that anchor seat at Fox News if I didn't feel celebrated.  Diversity is not just about what you will tolerate but, rather what you celebrate. For others who want to be in my shoes:  Your work ethic, your dedication, your courage your determination, your vision for yourself and for what you want to impart on viewers and how you want to do that and the kind of platform you'll need… are all up to you. There is no one who's going to sit and hold your hand and say, “Well you know if you do these 25 things it's going to be perfect.” It is never going to be perfect, but it can be really amazing, which is what my journey has been. I've got a No.1 show at 1 p.m. Eastern on all of cable. I'm doing primetime specials like my franchise, “Town Hall America with Harris Faulkner” for which I travel all over from Arizona to Iowa on all sorts of issues Just this season alone, I was in Iowa with an audience of people from both sides of the political aisle. That's a big thing with me. I get really bored when everybody says the same thing, and I figure if I'm bored everybody else must be bored too. Being