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Wall of Bakers: 3 Judges You Knead to Meet   If you loved Wall of Chef, you will most definitely be interested in watching Wall of Bakers on Food Network Canada! This exciting new show proposes a sweet competition as they like to call it, where different Canadian Home bakers will have the opportunity to show off their skills. “The winner takes it all” The best baker wins a $10,000 cash prize. We had the opportunity to interview some of the judges who also shared their love of baking with us. Chef Christine Cushing Why do you love baking? I love baking because it is the perfect blend of science and creativity. It can test your stamina, challenge you, and bring you to your knees completely out of nowhere. Then one day, it can give you the greatest feeling of accomplishment that you actually created something magical with a few simple ingredients. It's emotional and involves all the senses.  When did you start baking? I fell in love with baking when I first got my hands on an Easy-Bake Oven, around the age of 8. That 6-Watt light bulb was pure magic. I would make the little vanilla cakes with the strawberry flecked icing for my 4-year-old brother. I can still remember us sliding them in one side and then being so excited to pull them out once they were just baked at the other end. Then I would proceed with the icing smear.  Later in my teens, I started my baking journey in earnest, making apple pies, chocolate cakes and supplying a local restaurant with black forest cakes, around the age of 16. This unforgettable adventure involved many all-nighters – on school nights – with the kitchen left in a total disaster to my mom who had to deal with the cleaning, while I hurried off to the school the next morning. Why is it important to get kids in the kitchen? Bringing kids into the kitchen early is absolutely imperative. Firstly, it gives them a sense of purpose, belonging and contributing to the family unit. They start learning to work with all their senses and experiment. They will be more likely to try new foods if they have helped to prepare them. It's also a great way to develop your confidence with small victories. I also felt that cooking got me through some difficult times; when my dad had a serious heart attack, cooking was what I would now identify as a

On-screen, Dani Kind plays Anne Carlson, an unapologetic mom, friend and psychiatrist whose wit is as sharp as her tongue. In real life, the Workin’ Mom of two boys says there’s a bit of every woman in the cast of characters within her — and most of the women she knows — which is why the show is such a hit with not only Canadians but with audiences worldwide. We sat down with Kind to talk about being Anne, Season 6 and the authenticity of Workin’ Moms. By Rachel Naud We have to say, Workin’ Moms is truly a laugh-out-loud show. It makes me laugh out loud too. It’s funny because when I read it on the page, I’m like ‘is that funny? Is what we’re doing funny?' We’re in the bubble shooting it and every year, I’m just like ‘I don’t know.’ And then when I see it cut together, I think ‘this is so good.’ How has your character, Anne, evolved throughout the series? I think she comes off as angry or aggressive or whatever, and I feel like with anybody in life, whatever works for you, works for you until it doesn’t. I think this season she takes a look at that for her. I think she has gotten away with a lot of things in her life because she’s Anne and that’s how she is. Like, the things she has said in Mommy and Me and the way she has addressed other women. I think emotionally she’s going to have to take a look at herself this year in a way that she hasn’t in any of the previous years. What is Anne in for this season? She’s back in Toronto and has to start from ground zero again. She doesn’t have any clients anymore. She has done this before, but this is post-Cochrane. She is discombobulated. She was all messed up. So, this year of her starting over again is almost starting from the most vulnerable place. She’s by herself because her husband is in Cochrane, and she still has a teenage daughter and a toddler and she’s in it. How would you describe Anne’s Workin’ Mom parenting style with Dani’s Workin’ Mom parenting style? I mean, I would never jump out of a bush and tell my kid to punch me in the dick. Like I would never do that. But I’m so close to that. I definitely talk to my kids like they’re

Teen Activist Hannah Alper Sets Sights on Changing  World Hannah Alper, a 17-year-old advocate and blogger, is out to change the world. Her work has impacted many lives through her insight on climate change, social justice and anti-bullying. She has not only written a book titled Momentus, but she also speaks at conferences and TED Talks around the world. She also recently appeared in a documentary called CitizenKid: Earth Comes First, which raises awareness of climate change issues and empowers kids to take action. “I never thought that I was too young (to become an activist), I just did it,” she said when asked about her many accomplishments as a young teen. INBETWEEN sat down with Alper to talk about her experience as a blogger, activist and motivational speaker and what she plans on doing next. In your blog and in your social media you are able to portray endless positivity. To what do you owe this enviable trait? My parents have always taught me to be a passionate and positive person. I am always called passionate, positive and optimistic. With all of the issues going on today, I could not do what I do without bringing positivity. There are so many things that we can do even though there are a lot of problems in the world. But we can be that change together. What is your biggest motivator? My parents. They have been to Washington and Kenya with me. I can talk to them about the issues I care about and share my experiences with them. I would also say that those young people that make a difference in the world also motivate me. They make me feel as if I am not alone and that there is always something you can do to make a difference. In a world where social media is on the rise and many young people are starting to gain their own voices, what would you say to young bloggers who want to make a difference? Keep going. I truly believe that social media is the biggest and best tool that we can use to change the world. If anyone is struggling with getting people to pay attention and join a movement, you need to keep going. We always need more people to share what they care about and social media is one way that we can begin that change. Social media is a truly incredible place and kids often

10 Teen Slang Words You Should Know Every generation has their own, unique way of influencing language, like creating slang that only their peers will understand. Today, as Gen Zers enter teenhood, many Xennials and Millennials will be hard-pressed to understand exactly what on earth they’re saying. With new cultural reference points and trending speaking styles coming from celebrities, shows and memes – basically, the Internet – now may be the time to follow in Oprah and Gayle’s footsteps and freshen up on your teen slang. “Slang is, by definition, just informal language. In that sense, slang shouldn’t be considered “degraded language” but, rather, a variant of the predominant variety used by a community of speakers. From a sociolinguistic perspective, adolescents are generally the primary drivers of language change. They are more daring and creative with regard to language and they innovate much more than do speakers in other age brackets. This tendency to innovate language is part in parcel of the cognitive development that teenagers experience during adolescence, which sees them asserting their independence from their family unit and forging strong social connections with peers. Peppering their everyday speak with slang terms known primarily or exclusively within the peer group helps to solidify the new social bonds”, says Jennifer Dorman, Instructional Designer in Didactics at leading language app Babbel. So you can get down with the kids – linguistically, at any rate –Dorman shares some of the most popular teen slang today, along with definitions: Skrrt: Rapidly leaving / expression of excitement The easiest way to wrap your mind around this term is to think of the sound a car makes as it’s driving away at high speed, with its wheels screeching. It’s pronounced similarly to ‘skirt’, but usually in a high-pitched tone, and was first popularized in rap songs to convey the rapper trying to get away from something, or someone. Waste man: Worthless person A waste man is a negative term to refer to someone who makes poor decisions, acts poorly or is not doing much with their lives. Finsta: Fake / Fun Instagram This term is another attempt by teens to deceive their parents and was originally used to refer to a ‘fake Instagram’ account, which would be used for posts you don’t want your parents, or wider family, to see. The meaning has since grown to include any secondary or fake item, like a second Twitter account, or a secret phone. Cancelled: No longer relevant Frequently used when speaking about celebrities who are considered no longer relevant, or have said or done